Posts tagged “dental hygiene”

Don’t Forget Your Mouth. Five Ways to Happier Teeth in 2017

At this time of year, many of us make an effort to be healthier. After the indulgence of the festive season, it’s that time when we sign up for gym membership and put the selection boxes to the back of the cupboard. It’s great to try and cut down on fatty foods and get in shape, but what about your teeth and gums? When you’re trying to stick to resolutions, spare a thought for your mouth. Dental health is really important too! Here are five ways you can achieve healthier teeth in 2017.

  1. Change your toothbrush. Be honest. When was the last time you changed your toothbrush? If you can’t remember, it’s probably high time you invested in a new brush or swapped the brush head. Ideally, you should switch brushes every 3-4 months. If the bristles are worn or damaged, this can affect its cleaning capabilities.
  2. Brush properly. Are you one of those people who sometimes flashes a brush around their teeth and hopes for the best? If so, make it your mission to hone those brushing skills. Brushing is your best form of defence against plaque and tartar. Take care to cover every tooth, and set a timer to make sure that you’re brushing for long enough.
  3. Use fluoride toothpaste: fluoride is a mineral, which is often found in toothpaste. It has oral health benefits because it helps to strengthen the enamel surface. This helps to reduce the risk of decay and prevent cavities from forming.
  4. Stop snacking! Snacking is bad for your waistline, but it’s also harmful for your teeth. When you eat, your enamel becomes softer, and it takes around an hour for it remineralise and recover. If you snack all day, your teeth never have chance to recover, and the risk of damage and decay is elevated.
  5. Call and make a dental appointment. If you do anything in 2017, make sure you visit the dentist regularly. If you haven’t been for a check-up in the last nine months, call and make an appointment now. Research suggests that people who attend regular dental checks are up to 60 percent less likely to suffer from decay and gum disease than those who avoid the dentist.

Keep Your Mouth Happy with Hygiene Therapy

dental-treatmentWe offer an array of general and preventative dental services to promote good oral health, as well as cosmetic dentistry, orthodontic services and restorative treatment. Your health is extremely important to us and we recommend regular dental check-ups and sessions with our excellent hygienists.

What are the benefits of seeing a hygienist?

There are so many advantages of adding a hygiene session into your oral health routine. Hygienists are trained to provide dental hygiene treatments, oral health advice and treatment for oral health diseases, such as gum disease, so they really can make a difference to your oral health. Patients who have a high risk of gum disease, those who have active signs of gum disease and those who suffer from issues such as bad breath are often advised to see a dental hygienist on a regular basis.

Hygienists provide cleaning treatments that are much more powerful than brushing at home. They remove bacteria, break up food debris and cleanse the gums, to reduce the risk of gum disease and cavities and tackle plaque and tartar.

I’ve got healthy teeth and gums: do I still need to see a hygienist?

Even if you have strong, healthy teeth and no signs of decay or gum disease, seeing a hygienist is still hugely beneficial and it will help to ensure that you continue to enjoy good oral health. As well as removing any harmful traces of bacteria from your mouth, seeing a hygienist for a cleaning treatment can also help to make your teeth look brighter and whiter and remove surface stains. Your teeth will also feel lovely and smooth and you get a wonderful fresh feeling, which you can’t achieve when you brush at home.

Why is oral health so important?

Oral health is sometimes moved down the list when it comes to health priorities and many patients admit to skipping dental appointments. But we are eager to raise awareness of the importance of good oral health and encourage our patients to stick to regular check-ups and take good care of their teeth and gums at home. Studies have shown that oral health problems are linked to an increased risk of general health problems and brushing the teeth and seeing your dentist on a regular basis can help to cut your risk of developing serious, life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and strokes.

Five Foods Your Teeth Don’t Want You to Eat

Most of us know all too well the devastating impact sugar can have on our health. Although these dangers are nothing new, dentists are as keen as ever to warn against eating too many enamel enemies.

Sugar is a real baddie because it causes the bacteria in our mouths to release nasty plaque acids that erode our tooth enamel. When tooth enamel becomes thinner, it can’t be regenerated, so we’re more at risk of icky infections. Here are five foods to avoid if you want to keep your tooth enamel good and strong:

Cakes

Sadly, some of the nation’s favourite foods and drinks are overflowing with sugar and cakes are no exception. These indulgent treats are the bees knees, but if you’ve ever baked one yourself or been brave enough to read the nutrition label on a shop bought slice, you’ll know exactly how much sugar goes into these decadent delights.

Crisps

Although a savoury snack, crisps are full of starchy carbs that eventually convert into sugar. Crisps can also get wedged in the cracks between our teeth and this makes plaque formation more likely.

 Chewy sweets

Chewy sweets are not just full of sugar, they also get stuck in the pits and grooves of our teeth, letting pesky plaque reign ruin over our mouths.

 Sports drinks

Sports drinks are often marketed as healthy, but your teeth wouldn’t agree. Many of them have as much sugar in them as fizzy soft drinks and this doesn’t just increase your risk of tooth decay and gum disease. It’s also linked with a higher risk of serious health complications like diabetes.

 Wine

A popular after-work tipple, wine also spells bad news for our teeth. This alcoholic beverage is very acidic, which means it has the power to erode enamel something rotten. It’s also a big tooth stainer – and that’s white wine as well as red!

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